Build a playbook to implement supply chain resilience




Through ·

My article “Risk Management in Times of Extreme Uncertainty” appeared in the July 2020 issue of SCMR. The world had just woken up to the first quarter of the COVID-19 pandemic. Supply chains were disrupted globally and turnaround times from order to delivery or O2D had suddenly increased by 50% in some cases. Ports were congested and containers lined up waiting to be unloaded. Supply shelves in the United States were emptier than I’ve seen in 30 years. As the severity of the pandemic eased and the world began to clear itself, we faced a new global problem – a senseless war in Ukraine coupled with global monetary policy that combined a delayed response with signs of an inexplicable bull market.

In the United States, consumers felt the pressure within weeks. Oil prices rose worldwide as sanctions against Russia took hold. The price of gasoline increased by 22% in April 2022. As Ukraine is a major wheat producer, the impact on food prices was perceived as a lagging indicator. As if we didn’t need a reminder that unexpected disruptions continue to crop up, last September the United States narrowly averted a rail strike that would have further crippled domestic supply chains.

As organizations rethink their supply chains to respond to instability, unpredictability, and the unexpected, one factor is missing: a playbook or guide that can be used to implement a structured approach to supply chain resilience. However, no two situations will be the same and therefore, following the SCOR model, companies must look for areas that are appropriate and can be modified to accommodate future situations like today’s.

Through ·

My article “Risk Management in Times of Extreme Uncertainty” appeared in the July 2020 issue of SCMR. The world had just woken up to the first quarter of the COVID-19 pandemic. Supply chains were disrupted globally and turnaround times from order to delivery or O2D had suddenly increased by 50% in some cases. Ports were congested and containers lined up waiting to be unloaded. Supply shelves in the United States were emptier than I’ve seen in 30 years. As the severity of the pandemic eased and the world began to clear itself, we faced a new global problem – a senseless war in Ukraine coupled with global monetary policy that combined a delayed response with signs of an inexplicable bull market.

In the United States, consumers felt the pressure within weeks. Oil prices rose worldwide as sanctions against Russia took hold. The price of gasoline increased by 22% in April 2022. As Ukraine is a major wheat producer, the impact on food prices was perceived as a lagging indicator. As if we didn’t need a reminder that unexpected disruptions continue to crop up, last September the United States narrowly averted a rail strike that would have further crippled domestic supply chains.

As organizations rethink their supply chains to respond to instability, unpredictability, and the unexpected, one factor is missing: a playbook or guide that can be used to implement a structured approach to supply chain resilience. However, no two situations will be the same and therefore, following the SCOR model, companies must look for areas that are appropriate and can be modified to accommodate future situations like today’s.







November 7, 2022


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COVID-19 &mid Manufacturing &mid Resilience &mid
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